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Current Book Awards & Nominees: 2017/2018
    The 2018 Hugo Award [presented on Sunday, August 19, 2018. - more...]



    NOMINEES FOR THE 2018 HUGO AWARD: Best Science Fiction/Fantasy Novel:

  • The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi
  • New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Provenance by Ann Leckie
  • Raven Stratagem by Yoon Ha Lee
  • Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty
  • The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin *** WINNER ***
    The 2018 Hugo Award Nominees for Best Novel:

    (TOR/MPS)
    THE COLLAPSING EMPIRE by John Scalzi
    2018 HUGO AWARD FINALIST | 2018 LOCUS AWARD FINALIST
    Humanity has spread to innumerable other worlds. Earth is forgotten. A new empire arises, the Interdependency, based on the doctrine that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It's a hedge against interstellar war - and, for the empire's rulers, a system of control. The brilliant first novel of a new space-opera sequence set in an all-new universe by the Hugo Award-winning author of Redshirts and Old Man's War.
    "Scalzi mixes science, history, and politics with sharp action and intriguing characters. Readers will be thrilled to take another wild ride across the universe with the author of the Old Man's War series." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "Plenty of action, great character development, vivid and believable world-building, and a thought-provoking examination of culture and politics. . . Yet more evidence that Scalzi is a master." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
    "Scalzi has constructed a thrilling novel so in tune with the flow of politics that it would feel relevant at almost any time." — Entertainment Weekly.
    "The Collapsing Empire - whose title alone seems like an appallingly on-the-nose allegory for the state of the United States at this moment - is one of the most important revisionist hyperspace narratives to come along in some time. Combines elements of Asimov’s Foundation series with Banks’s Culture series, Herbert’s Dune, and Lucas’s Star Wars in ways that I found quite delightful as a life-long fan of the genre." — The Los Angeles Review of Books.

    (Orbit/Hachette)
    NEW YORK 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson
    2018 HUGO AWARD FINALIST
    In the 22nd century a series of climate disasters and ocean level risings have left New York City partially underwater. But the residents of the partially submerged Met Life skyscraper are determined to stay - and to survive. This is their story - a story of real estate, finance, climate change, treasure hunting, and kidnapping. Kim Stanley Robinson once again delivers a masterful novel of ecofiction.
    "The tale is one of adventure, intrigue, relationships, and market forces. The cast is large and varied. . . The individual threads weave together into a complex story well worth the read. This is hard SF the way it's meant to be written: technical, scientific, with big ideas and a fully realized society." — Booklist.
    "Exploring this vastly changed cityscape, where familiar streets are replaced by skybridges and subways by vaporettos, is great fun. A post-disaster fairy tale that's a thoroughly enjoyable exercise in worldbuilding, written with a cleareyed love for the city's past, present, and future." — Kirkus Reviews.
    "New York may be underwater, but it's better than ever." — The New Yorker.
    "Robinson, one of the greatest living science fiction writers, presents a drastically changed city that retains many of its eternal charms and perils. Sporting a diverse cast of characters and a bracing, rarely cynical tone, this is some of Robinson's nimblest writing to date. Through it all, though, his 2140-era New York City remains as delightfully confounding as the present iteration." — Shelf Awareness.

    (Orbit/Hachette)
    PROVENANCE by Ann Leckie
    2018 HUGO AWARD FINALIST
    A driven young woman has just one chance to win family approval and to secure the status she craves. To regain priceless stolen artifacts prized by her people, she must free their thief from a prison planet from which no one has ever returned. Following her record-breaking debut Ancillary trilogy, Ann Leckie, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C. Clarke and Locus Awards, returns with an enthralling new novel of power, privilege and birthright.
    "The intricacies and oddities are a delight. . . A thrill for fans of heists and capers." — The Washington Post
    "Setting her new novel in the same universe as her previous books, Leckie again uses large-scale worldbuilding to tell a deeply personal story - in this case, to explore what binds children to their families. As always, she impels the reader to consider the power that language has to shape perception and reality. The title is meaningful in several senses. More intriguing cultures to explore, more characters to care about, more Leckie to love." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***
    "A standalone SF thriller styled as a space opera of manners. . . full of the charm and wit characterizing Leckie's other works, including delightful appearances by a Radch ambassador and tantalizing hints about the upcoming conclave." — Publishers Weekly.
    "A perfect follow-up to the trilogy. . . Should please those who like tea with their space opera." — The New York Times
    [Currently available in hardcover - paperback to be released July 10, 2018]

    (Orbit/Hachette)
    RAVEN STRATAGEM by Yoon Ha Lee
    2018 HUGO AWARD FINALIST
    This stunning sequel to the Hugo and Nebula-nominated Ninefox Gambit contains a riveting mixture of interstellar battles, politics, intrigue, and arcane technology. This is world-building space-opera at its finest.
    "With multiple characters skilled in deception, Lee is able to keep readers guessing until the end. A brilliantly imagined tale." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "The sequel to Yoon Ha Lee’s phenomenal Ninefox Gambit, a sequel that is as mind-blowing as its predecessor but in a completely different way. How do you follow-up a breathtaking, multiple award-nominated debut that combined world-changing technologies, interesting reality-altering mathematics and awesome characters? You change perspective. Then add a plot to change the world. And then twist everything around half way through." — Kirkus Reviews.
    "Yoon Ha Lee breaks new ground, focusing tightly on questions of free will. Ninefox explored the ethics of war, Raven is unflinching in its criticism of the ethics of power. The entire novel acts as a strident call to arms: to reject inhumane government; to resist wherever possible. Raven is a triumphant continuation of a vibrant new space opera. I expected intrigue and entertainment; I wasn’t prepared for all the feelings. I can’t wait to see where Yoon Ha Lee takes this rollercoaster next." — The Speculative Herald.

    (Orbit/Hachette)
    SIX WAKES by Mur Lafferty
    2018 HUGO AWARD FINALIST | 2018 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
    The ship Dormire carries 2,000 colonists and a crew of six clones with criminal pasts who are hoping to build new lives with clean slates. But nearly 25 years into the mission, the ship's crew awaken from their cryogenic sleep in the middle of a bloody crime scene. A masterful mix of locked-room mystery detection and hard science-fiction that will enthrall fans of either genre.
    "Interleaving urgent scenes with telling flashbacks, Lafferty delivers a tense nail-biter of a story fueled by memorable characters and thoughtful worldbuilding. This space-based locked-room murder mystery explores complex technological and moral issues in a way that's certain to earn it a spot on award ballots." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Six survivors must figure out who killed their previous bodies and why. Lafferty delivers the ultimate locked-room mystery combined with top-notch sci-fi worldbuilding. The puzzle of who is responsible for the devastation on the ship keeps the pages turning." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "A taut, nerve-tingling, interstellar murder mystery with a deeply human heart." — NPR.
    "A perfect blend of science fiction and mystery, complete with Clue-like red herrings and thought-provoking philosophizing about the slippery slope of cloning technology. Lafferty jumps back and forth in time, developing each character and building a world in which human cloning is completely believable. Highly recommended." — Booklist.

    (Orbit/Hachette)

    WINNER
    THE STONE SKY by N.K. Jemisin
    2018 HUGO AWARD WINNER | 2017 NEBULA AWARD WINNER
    The earthshaking conclusion to Jemisin's powerful postapocalyptic Broken Earth trilogy (after The Fifth Season and The Obelisk Gate) finds the fate of a damaged world in the hands of a mother, who wants to save it, and her daughter, who wants to destroy it.
    "Unforgettable! Vivid characters, a tautly constructed plot, and outstanding worldbuilding meld into an impressive and timely story of abused, grieving survivors fighting to fix themselves and save the remnants of their shattered home." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Jemisin continues to break the heart with her sensitive, cleareyed depictions of a beyond-dysfunctional family and the extraordinarily destructive force that is prejudice. She wrestles with moral issues at an extreme level. Jemisin deliberately refuses to provide easy answers: they're simply not available, in this world or ours. Painful and powerful." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
    "Jemisin not only delivers but does it in a way that makes you appreciate how rarely series fiction manages to satisfy so well when it comes time for the final curtain. The Stone Sky manages to stick a very tricky and almost perfect landing, resolving the trilogy’s key conflicts, clarifying most of its mysteries, and outperforming on a level of sheer emotional and visceral punch. This is the work of a writer in complete command of her craft." — SFF180.
    "Jemisin is a master worldbuilder, and in the Broken Earth trilogy, she’s crafted something truly spectacular. A truly immersive reading experience. . . The Stone Sky is a heart-stopping conclusion to the trilogy." — Girls in Capes.


The 2018 Man Booker Prize
The Man Booker Prize is the world's most prestigious literary award. The prize promotes the finest in fiction by rewarding the very best novel of the year written in the English language.

  • The 2018 longlist (best 13 titles) was announced Tuesday, July 24, 2018.
    • Belinda Bauer (UK), Snap
    • Anna Burns (UK), Milkman
    • Nick Drnaso (USA), Sabrina
    • Esi Edugyan (Canada), Washington Black
    • Guy Gunaratne (UK), In Our Mad and Furious City
    • Daisy Johnson (UK), Everything Under
    • Rachel Kushner (USA), The Mars Room
    • Sophie Mackintosh (UK), The Water Cure
    • Michael Ondaatje (Canada), Warlight
    • Richard Powers (USA), The Overstory
    • Robin Robertson (UK), The Long Take
    • Sally Rooney (Ireland), Normal People
    • Donal Ryan (Ireland), From a Low and Quiet Sea
  • The 2018 shortlist (best 6 titles) will be announced Thursday, September 20, 2018.
  • The winner of the 2018 Man Booker Prize will be announced October 16, 2018


    The 2018 Man Booker International Prize
    Awarded annually for a single work of fiction that has been translated into English. Underlining the importance of translation, the £50,000 prize is divided equally between the author and the translator.
  • The longlist was announced on March 12, 2018
  • The shortlist was announced on April 12, 2018.
  • The winner was announced on Tuesday, May 22, 2018. [more...]

    THE 2018 MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE SHORTLIST:

    • Vernon Subutex 1 by Virginie Despentes (France) / translated by Frank Wynne
    • The White Book by Han Kang (South Korea) / translated by Deborah Smith
    • The World Goes On by László Krasznahorkai (Hungary) / translated by John Batki, Ottilie Mulzet & George Szirtes
    • Like a Fading Shadow by Antonio Muñoz Molina (Spain) / translated by Camilo A. Ramirez
    • Frankenstein in Baghdad by Ahmed Saadawi (Iraq) / translated by Jonathan Wright
    • Flights by Olga Tokarczuk (Poland) / translated by Jennifer Croft *** WINNER ***
  • Winner of the 2018 Man Booker International Prize [presented Saturday, May 19, 2018 - more...]

    (Riverhead/Penguin)
    FLIGHTS by Olga Tokarczuk | Translated by Jennifer Croft
    WINNER OF THE 2018 MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE
    A seventeenth-century Dutch anatomist discovers the Achilles tendon by dissecting his own amputated leg. Chopin's heart is carried back to Warsaw in secret by his adoring sister. A woman must return to her native Poland in order to poison her terminally ill high school sweetheart, and a young man slowly descends into madness when his wife and child mysteriously vanish during a vacation and just as suddenly reappear. Through these brilliantly imagined characters and interwoven stories, one of Europe's finest authors explores what it means to be a traveler, a wanderer, a body in motion - not only through space but through time. Enchanting, unsettling, and wholly original.
    "Fascinating. . . a novel of intuitions as much as ideas. Moves from wit and gleeful mischief to real emotional texture. . . Tokarczuk inhabits a rebellious, playful register very much her own. Flights is a passionate and enchantingly discursive plea for meaningful connectedness. I can think of no better travel companion in these turbulent, fanatical times." — The Guardian (U.K.).
    "Tokarczuk's peerless travel guide is actually a guide to living. This is as brilliant and life-affirming as literature gets. After reading this book, you'll likely never see the world the same again." — The Saturday Review.
    "This astonishing performance is Tokarczuk's glittering, bravura entry in the literature of ideas. A select few novels possess the wonder of music, and this is one of them. An international, mercurial, and always generous book, to be endlessly revisited." — The Los Angeles Review of Books.
    "Fearless... Flights is thrillingly transnational. Ms Tokarzcuk is unquestionably the highest-profile novelist of her generation in Poland. She knows how to weave poetic magic in radiantly readable prose." — The Economist (U.K.).


    The 2017 Nebula Award [presented Saturday, May 19, 2018 - more...]

    NOMINEES FOR THE 2017 NEBULA AWARD: Best Science Fiction/Fantasy Novel:

  • Amberlough by Lara Elena Donnelly
  • Autonomous by Annalee Newitz
  • Jade City by Fonda Lee
  • Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty
  • Spoonbenders by Daryl Gregory
  • The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin *** WINNER ***
  • The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter by Theodora Goss
  • The 2017 Nebula Award Winner for Best Novel [presented Saturday, May 19, 2018 - more...]

    (Orbit/Hachette)
    THE STONE SKY by N. K. Jemisin
    2017 NEBULA AWARD WINNER | 2018 HUGO AWARD FINALIST
    The earthshaking conclusion to Jemisin's powerful postapocalyptic Broken Earth trilogy (after The Fifth Season and The Obelisk Gate) finds the fate of a damaged world in the hands of a mother, who wants to save it, and her daughter, who wants to destroy it.
    "Unforgettable! Vivid characters, a tautly constructed plot, and outstanding worldbuilding meld into an impressive and timely story of abused, grieving survivors fighting to fix themselves and save the remnants of their shattered home." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Jemisin continues to break the heart with her sensitive, cleareyed depictions of a beyond-dysfunctional family and the extraordinarily destructive force that is prejudice. She wrestles with moral issues at an extreme level. Jemisin deliberately refuses to provide easy answers: they're simply not available, in this world or ours. Painful and powerful." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
    "Jemisin not only delivers but does it in a way that makes you appreciate how rarely series fiction manages to satisfy so well when it comes time for the final curtain. The Stone Sky manages to stick a very tricky and almost perfect landing, resolving the trilogy’s key conflicts, clarifying most of its mysteries, and outperforming on a level of sheer emotional and visceral punch. This is the work of a writer in complete command of her craft." — SFF180.
    "Jemisin is a master worldbuilder, and in the Broken Earth trilogy, she’s crafted something truly spectacular. A truly immersive reading experience. . . The Stone Sky is a heart-stopping conclusion to the trilogy." — Girls in Capes.
    The 2017 Nebula Finalist Nominees for Best Novel

    (TOR/MPS)
    AMBERLOUGH by Lana Elena Donnelly
    2018 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST

    In freewheeling and decadent Amberlough, spies, criminals, cabaret bohemians, and lovers struggle to save what matters to each of them from a tide of rising fascism and violence. Donnelly's debut - set in a richly imagined city evocative of Weimar-era Berlin - is an audacious blend of espionage, romance, and tragedy.
    "Amberlough has an amazing voice. Its spy-thriller twists and ever-growing tension combine to provide an extraordinarily entertaining ride. And I have to say: if this is her debut? I can’t wait to see what Donnelly does next." — Locus.
    "Donnelly's striking debut brings a complex world of politics, espionage, and cabaret life to full vision. The emotional journeys of the characters as they struggle to survive in a society under siege by dark forces will strike a chord with readers as they race to the story's conclusion." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "Donnelly's masterly creation is richly imagined and moves at an unchecked pace, painting a layer of sumptuous indulgence over a society of corruption, vice, and oppression. the characters are drawn inexorably to their limits in a conclusion that is as heartbreaking as it is satisfying." — Publisher's Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "A sense of inevitable loss and futility permeates this rich drama. The fascists may never be defeated but only escaped - if the characters are willing to abandon the people they love. That dilemma will haunt them, as it haunts the reader." — Kirkus Reviews.

    (Tor/MPS)
    AUTONOMOUS by Annalee Newitz
    2017 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
    Jack Chen is a drug pirate, traversing the world in a submarine as a pharmaceutical Robin Hood, fabricating cheap cures for poor people who can't otherwise afford them. But her latest drug hack has left a trail of lethal overdoses as people become addicted to their work, doing repetitive tasks until they become unsafe or insane. Now she must rectify the damage by finding a cure and exposing the corrupt manufacturer who first developed the drug. Annalee Newitz explores issues of free will, social accountability, and scientific responsibility in a dazzling futuristic thriller.
    "In a phenomenal debut that's sure to garner significant awards attention, Newitz sends three fascinating characters on an action-packed race against time through a strange yet familiar futuristic landscape. A skillful inspection of attraction and identity in a fragmented, frenetic society." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Newitz takes some of today's key social and technical issues (the nature of artificial intelligence, the notion of property and ownership) and wraps them in a compelling, original story line acted out by memorable characters. VERDICT: Lovers of original, thought-provoking SF should not miss this one." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "Fascinating. . . Newitz is an excellent writer, with an effortless style. A terrific book that covers an astounding amount of ground. You will be the smarter for it." — The San Francisco Chronicle.
    "From startling insights, to delicately turned prose, to whole passages of unbearably tender musings on the intimate desires of artificial intelligence, there's much more than I can feasibly talk about here. Breathtaking descriptions. . . tremendously compelling character arcs. . . Autonomous brims and bubbles over with ideas. It's a brilliant, fascinating debut, beautifully written and developed, and I'm excited to see what conversations it provokes." — NPR Book Reviews.

    (Orbit/Hachette)
    JADE CITY by Fonda Lee
    2017 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST | Best Book of the Year: Locus Magazine, The Verge, and NPR
    The island of Kekon is protected from foreign invasion by the magical jade mined there. But now the honor-driven Kaul family seizes control of the market, even as a new drug lets anyone use the fierce power of the jade. The first in a trilogy inspired by Asian warring clans history, this is an absolutely enthralling saga of intrigue, ambition, and magic.
    "Lee draws on her Chinese heritage, passion for gangster stories, and strong writing to launch a Godfather-inspired fantasy series that mixes bold martial-arts action and vivid worldbuilding. The result is terrific." — Library Journal PICK-OF-THE-MONTH *** starred review ***.
    "Lee has created a fully realized universe in which to expand, with a solid magic system and boatloads of history and gravitas. Jade City flows with a sense of purpose, visceral brutality and dizzying spectacle." — BookPage *** starred review ***.
    "An intrigue-packed adventure set in an Asia-inspired, alternate-world modern city. As this ambitious and complex story unfolds, Lee skillfully juggles a huge cast. An engaging blend of crime drama and Asian martial arts tropes in a strongly envisioned world. . . an intense, satisfying experience." — Publishers Weekly.
    "An absolutely blistering read. The characters are perfectly three-dimensional. The plot is thrilling and the action sequences are damn near perfect. I cannot recommend Jade City highly enough." — The Eloquent Page.
    "Stunning. . . Brilliant. . . Exceptionally deep and fully realized characters. . . There is a complexity surrounding this book’s ensemble that is rarely seen in the first book of a series. The character progression is also exquisite. An epic, unique, and often unforgiving gangster fantasy narrative intertwined with glimpses of hope and goodness." — Fantasy Book Review.
    "An instantly absorbing tale of blood, honor, family and magic, spiced with unexpectedly tender character beats." — NPR Book Reviews.

    (Orbit/Hachette)
    SIX WAKES by Mur Lafferty
    2018 HUGO AWARD FINALIST | 2018 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
    The ship Dormire carries 2,000 colonists and a crew of six clones with criminal pasts who are hoping to build new lives with clean slates. But nearly 25 years into the mission, the ship's crew awaken from their cryogenic sleep in the middle of a bloody crime scene. A masterful mix of locked-room mystery detection and hard science-fiction that will enthrall fans of either genre.
    "Interleaving urgent scenes with telling flashbacks, Lafferty delivers a tense nail-biter of a story fueled by memorable characters and thoughtful worldbuilding. This space-based locked-room murder mystery explores complex technological and moral issues in a way that's certain to earn it a spot on award ballots." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Six survivors must figure out who killed their previous bodies and why. Lafferty delivers the ultimate locked-room mystery combined with top-notch sci-fi worldbuilding. The puzzle of who is responsible for the devastation on the ship keeps the pages turning." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "A taut, nerve-tingling, interstellar murder mystery with a deeply human heart." — NPR Book Reviews.
    "A perfect blend of science fiction and mystery, complete with Clue-like red herrings and thought-provoking philosophizing about the slippery slope of cloning technology. Lafferty jumps back and forth in time, developing each character and building a world in which human cloning is completely believable. Highly recommended." — Booklist.

    (Knopf/Random)
    SPOONBENDERS by Daryl Gregory
    2017 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
    Tricking his way into a classified government study, Teddy Telemachus meets and falls in love with Maureen, a genuine psychic of immense and mysterious power. They marry, raise three gifted children, and as The Amazing Telemachus Family, perform astounding feats across the country. Then one night tragedy leaves the family shattered. Master storyteller Daryl Gregory delivers a stunning novel about a family of gifted dreamers and the invisible forces that bind us all.
    "A nimble and substantial novel with a cast of odd, damaged, enormously likable characters in a complex story that gracefully balances melodrama with the ordinary mysteries of family dynamics. Each of the characters has a precise energy and depth that makes him or her irresistible. The chapters shift between their points of view, revealing different threads of the story with masterful control. A skillfully written family drama that employs quirk and magic with grace." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
    "Daryl Gregory has created a captivating cast. These are eccentric people with eccentric lives, but the level of emotional detail at work is astounding, and Gregory's magic touch makes even their strangest moments relatable. An intensely endearing read. . . The premise will hook you, the plot will entice you, and then the Telemachuses themselves will make you fall in love." — BookPage *** starred review ***.
    "What Daryl Gregory accomplishes in his seventh novel is both magic and magic trick. Gregory writes with humor and charm, offering up a rollicking and quick-paced plot tailor-made for summer." — The New York Times.
    "Superbly engaging, balancing delightful wackiness with genuine tenderness throughout. Deeply moving, faceted, complex and affecting." — NPR Book Reviews.

    (Saga/Simon & Schuster)
    THE STRANGE CASE OF THE ALCHEMIST'S DAUGHTER by Theodora Goss
    2018 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
    A remarkable group of women come together to solve the mystery of a series of gruesome murders - and the bigger mystery of their own origins. When their investigations lead them to the discovery of a secret society of immoral and power-crazed scientists, the horrors of their past return. An utterly delightful gothic gem of a novel!
    "A standout pastiche of late Victorian mystery fiction, set in an alternate 1880s London and featuring Sherlock Holmes and a quintet of remarkable women. This is a tour de force of reclaiming the narrative, executed with impressive wit and insight." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Theodora Goss has assembled a deceptively intricate mosaic of friendship, family, history, science, and the way literature - not to mention truth - can be manipulated. As each of the characters' haunting pasts comes to light, the book's balance between academic playfulness and poignant storytelling becomes more exquisite. A swiftly paced, immaculately plotted mystery full of winning characters you always thought you knew. Overhauls, and pokes gentle fun at the era's weird-fiction tradition. But it's also a sparkling, insightful conversation with the canon from which it sprang." — NPR Book Reviews.
    "Goss upends fantasy tropes to bring to life characters who would have been ignored in the period works that inspired them, and the result is a fantastic, gripping read that feels true to the spirit of the original works, but updated with a modern spin for the 21st century reader." — The Verge.


    The 2018 Edgar Award [presented April 26, 2018 - more...]

    2018 EDGAR AWARD NOMINEES: Best Mystery Novel:

  • The Dime by Kathleen Kent
  • Prussian Blue by Philip Kerr
  • Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke *** WINNER ***
  • A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee
  • The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti
    The 2018 Edgar Award Winners:

  • 2018 BEST MYSTERY / SUSPENSE NOVEL: BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD by Attica Locke

    (Mulholland/Hachette)
    WINNER OF THE 2018 EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL
    BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD by Attica Locke
    A New York Times Book Review EDITORS' CHOICE.
    A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: Financial Times (U.K.), Vulture, The Strand Magazine, Southern Living, Publisher's Weekly, Book Riot, The Guardian (U.K.), Lit Hub, The Boston Globe, Dallas News, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, National Public Radio, Texas Monthly, The Daily Beast, and the South Florida Sun Sentinel

    When it comes to law and order, East Texas plays by its own rules - a fact that Darren Mathews, a black Texas Ranger, knows all too well. Deeply ambivalent about growing up black in the lone star state, he was the first in his family to get as far away from Texas as he could. Until duty called him home. Attica Locke delivers a propulsive novel concerning past deeds, injustice and courage. A riveting masterpiece of Southern noir - and much more: it's also a powerful and dramatic look at contemporary black life in rural America.
    "An emotionally dense and intricately detailed thriller, roiling with conflicting emotions steeped in this nation's troubled past and present. A rich sense of place and relentless feeling of dread permeate Attica Locke's heartbreakingly resonant new novel about race and justice in America. Bluebird, Bluebird is no simple morality tale. Far from it. It rises above 'left and right' and 'black and white' and follows the threads that inevitably bind us together, even as we rip them apart." — USA Today.
    "Stupendous. . . Pushing her classic noir plot deep into history and culture, Attica Locke sings her own unshakable, timeless lament. Streaked with wit and hard-earned wisdom, Bluebird, Bluebird soars." — The Chicago Tribune.
    "Locke's mesmerizing new novel bears all the hallmarks of modern crime fiction: the alcoholic protagonist with the damaged marriage; the townsfolk who close rank against outsiders; the small-town law enforcement agent with murky loyalties. But Bluebird, Bluebird is a true original in the way it twists these conventions into a narrative of exhilarating immediacy. Locke is building a compelling body of work. In this age of enduring and renewed racial tensions, we need her voice more than ever." — The Guardian (U.K.).
    "Gripping, suspenseful and gut-wrenching. . . I've never bought the notion of the Great American Novel, but if Attica Locke's Bluebird Bluebird isn't on literary historians' lists, I'm coming back to haunt them. This is a layered portrait of a black man confronting his own racial ambivalence and ambition told with a pointed and poignant bluesy lyricism. . . Locke's novel is America 'telling on itself.' Listen up." — The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.

  • 2018 BEST FIRST NOVEL: SHE RIDES SHOTGUN by Jordan Harper

    (Ecco/Harper)
    WINNER OF THE 2018 EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FIRST NOVEL
    SHE RIDES SHOTGUN by Jordan Harper
    Polly McClusky is eleven years old when she is unexpectedly reunited with her ex-convict father and is flung into a world of robbery, violence, and the constant threat of death. Confident, brutal, but always human, Jordan Harper's debut novel is a darkly irresistible parable of family and sacrifice. With an intelligence and fervor all her own, Polly McClusky is an unforgettable character.
    "From its bravura prologue to its immensely satisfying ending, this first novel comes out with guns blazing and shoots the chambers dry. It's both a dark, original take on the chase novel and a strangely touching portrait of a father-daughter relationship framed in barbed wire." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
    "The characters' loyalty, love, and struggle for redemption grip the reader and don't let go." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
    "A True Grit sort of saga, but on hot-wired horsepower instead of horseback. With Harper's storytelling chops, it's a rolling hell-bent adventure with all the snappy dialogue and action of the best noir fiction." — Shelf Awareness *** starred review ***.
    "Buckle up for a winning debut! A visceral noir that will at turns shock, delight and completely subvert readers’ expectations. An emotionally resonant road story that puts the pedal to the medal." — BookPage *** starred review ***.
    "Fascinating, tightly written. Readers will find this book hard - hard to put down." — St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

  • 2018 BEST FACT CRIME: KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

    (Vintage/Random)
    WINNER OF THE 2018 EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FACT CRIME
    KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann
    A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, The San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, NPR, Vogue, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, The Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub, and Slate.
    In the 1920s, members of the oil-rich Native American tribe, the Osage Nation, began to be murdered one by one. Those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll rose, the newly created FBI took up the case, and together with the Osage began to expose a chilling conspiracy. Based on years of research and new evidence, David Gann (author of The Lost City of Z) delivers a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history.
    "A master of the detective form. . . Killers of the Flower Moon is something deep and not easily forgotten." — The Wall Street Jpournal.
    "A masterful work of literary journalism crafted with the urgency of a mystery. . . Mesmerizing storytelling." — The Boston Globe.
    "Masterful! A story of murder, betrayal, heroism and a nation's struggle to leave its frontier culture behind and enter the modern world. Filled with almost mythic characters from our past, it's a haunting tale of unimaginable betrayal, naked greed and the birth of modern law enforcement." — Rolling Stone.
    "Close to impeccable. It's confident, fluid in its dynamics, light on its feet. The crime story it tells is appalling, and stocked with authentic heroes and villains. It will make you cringe at man's inhumanity to man. Grann has proved himself a master of spinning delicious, many-layered mysteries that also happen to be true. It will sear your soul." — The New York Times.


    The 2018 Pulitzer Prizes [presented April 16, 2018 - more...]

  • FICTION:

    (Lee Boudreaux/
    Hachette)
    WINNER OF THE 2018 PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION
    A New York Times Notable Book of the Year | A Washington Post Top Ten Book of the Year
    A San Francisco Chronicle Top Ten Book of the Year

    LESS by Andrew Sean Greer
    Arthur Less, a gay failed novelist turning 50, decides to avoid an ex-boyfriend's awkward wedding by skipping town. Accepting invitations from every half-baked literary event in the world, Arthur finds himself in one embarrassing, perilous, ridiculous situation after another. From Mexico City to Berlin, from Marrakech to Kyoto, mishaps, missteps, misunderstandings and mistakes abound and compound. A writer at the peak of his talents, Andrew Sean Greer delivers a scintillating satire of the American abroad, a rumination on time and the human heart, and a bittersweet romance of chances lost.
    "Less is the funniest, smartest and most humane novel I've read. . . Greer writes sentences of arresting lyricism and beauty. His metaphors come at you like fireflies. It's no less than bedazzling, bewitching and be-wonderful." — The New York Times.
    "Greer signals his debt to Proust and paints a comic yet moving picture of an American abroad. As Greer explores Less' lovelorn memories, he also playfully mocks the often ludicrous nature of the publishing industry. His finest novel yet. . . Less is a wondrous achievement!" — Booklist *** starred review ***.
    "Greer is an exceptionally lovely writer, capable of mingling humor with sharp poignancy. . . Brilliantly funny. . . Greer's narration, so elegantly laced with wit, cradles the story of a man who loses everything: his lover, his suitcase, his beard, his dignity." — The Washington Post.
    "Philosophical, poignant, funny and wise, filled with unexpected turns. . . Although Greer is gifted and subtle in comic moments, he's just as adept at ruminating on the deeper stuff. His protagonist grapples with aging, loneliness, creativity, grief, self-pity and more." — The San Francisco Chronicle.
    "Less adorably butchers the German language, nearly falls in love in Paris, celebrates his birthday in the desert and, somewhere along the way, discovers something new and fragile about the passing of time, about the coming and going of love, and what it means to be the fool of your own narrative. It's nothing less than wonderful."— BookPage *** starred review ***.

  • GENERAL NON-FICTION:

    (FSG/Macmillan)

    10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
    WINNER OF THE 2018 PULITZER PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION
    A New York Times Top Ten Book of the Year

    LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman
    The war on crime that began in the 1970s and contributed to the rise of mass incarceration - along with its disproportionate impact on people of color - was supported by many African American leaders in the nation's urban centers. James Forman seeks to understand how and why.
    "Superb and shattering. . . A masterly account of how a generation of black elected officials wrestled with recurring crises of violence and drug use in the nation's capital. A big deal and a major breakthrough. Forman's novel claim is this: What most explains the punitive turn in black America is not a repudiation of civil rights activism, as some have argued, but an embrace of it. . . Locking Up Our Own compels readers to wrestle with some very tough questions about the nature of American democracy and its deep roots in racism, inequality and punishment." — The New York Times.
    "Forman's moving, nuanced, and candid account challenges another aspect of the New Jim Crow thesis. He shows that some of the most ardent proponents of tough-on-crime policies in the era that brought us mass incarceration were black politicians and community leaders - many of whom were veterans of the civil rights movement. The correctives offered by Forman have consequences not only for how we understand mass incarceration, but for how we go about fixing it." — The New York Review of Books.
    "Remarkable. . . Forman's beautifully written narrative, enriched by firsthand knowledge of the cops and courts, neither condemns black leaders in hindsight nor exonerates the white-dominated institutions. He adds historical nuance to the story of mass incarceration told in The New Jim Crow." — The Washington Post.
    "A gritty, eloquent, often revelatory work of local history, interspersed with tales of Forman's experiences as a public defender. A sobering chronicle of how black people, in the hope of saving their communities, contributed to the rise of a system that has undone much of the progress of the civil rights era. But, as Forman knows, they could not have built it by themselves." — The London Review of Books (U.K.).
    "Poignant and insightful. Forman deftly moves between examples of black community support for a law-and-order crackdown and the dire present-day consequences of our increasingly punitive and aggressive war on crime. Timely and important." — The San Francisco Chronicle.

  • HISTORY:

    (Liveright/Norton)
    WINNER OF THE 2018 PULITZER PRIZE FOR HISTORY
    Winner of the 2017 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction

    GULF: The Making of an American Sea by Jack E. Davis
    An incisive and comprehensive portrait of the Gulf of Mexico - from its lusty birth in the chaos of shifting continental plates to its slow and agonizing death of a million cuts inflicted by pollution and exploitation. Frequently viewing the history of the Gulf through the prism of artists and writers including Winslow Homer, Wallace Stevens, Ernest Hemingway and John D. MacDonald, the author has delivered a uniquely illuminating homage to one of the world's most diverse and productive marine ecosystems.
    "Environmental historian Davis presents an engaging, truly relevant new study of the Gulf as a powerful agent in the American story, one that has become lost in the pages of American history. The story of this magnificent body of water and its wildlife grows tragic. . . Still, it remains an improbable, valiant survival tale in the face of the BP oil spill and ongoing climate change. An elegant narrative braced by a fierce, sobering environmental conviction." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***..
    "This is a work of astonishing breadth: richly peopled, finely structured, beautifully written." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "A perceptive historical survey of America's Gulf Coast, this fascinating work accents the region's nexus between nature and civilization. Amid the land and seascapes Davis populates colorful characters, from would-be conquistadors to business and tourism entrepreneurs to environmental activists, who form a gallery of human interest that easily carries the reader from cover to cover." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
    "A sprightly and sweeping new history. . . Davis has written a beautiful homage to a neglected sea, a lyrical paean to its remaining estuaries and marshes, and a marvelous mash-up of human and environmental history." — The New York Times.
    "An enthralling splendid new book. . . Davis is a historian, and this book is packed with research, but The Gulf does not read like a textbook. He is a graceful, clear, often lyrical writer who makes sometimes surprising, always illuminating connections - and he is telling an important story. — The Tampa Bay Times.

  • BIOGRAPHY:

    (Metropolitan/MPS)

    10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
    WINNER OF THE 2018 PULITZER PRIZE FOR BIOGRAPHY
    Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award | A New York Times Top Ten Book of the Year

    PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
    The first comprehensive historical biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder, the beloved author of the Little House on the Prairie books. Spanning nearly a century of epochal change, from the Indian Wars to the Dust Bowl, Wilder's dramatic life provides a unique perspective on American history and our national mythology of self-reliance. With fresh insights and new discoveries, Prairie Fires reveals the complex woman whose classic stories grip us to this day.
    "An absorbing new biography that deserves recognition as an essential text. For anyone who has drifted into thinking of Wilder's Little House books as relics of a distant and irrelevant past, reading Prairie Fires will provide a lasting cure. Meanwhile, Little House devotees will appreciate the extraordinary care and energy Fraser devotes to uncovering the details of a life that has been expertly veiled by myth." — The New York Times.
    "Unforgettable. . . A magisterial biography, richly documented, it is a compelling, beautifully written story. One of the more interesting aspects of this wonderfully insightful book is its delineation of the fraught relationship between Wilder and her deeply disturbed, often suicidal daughter. But it is its marriage of biography and history - the latter providing such a rich context for the life - that is one of the great strengths of this indispensable book." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
    "A tale of true grit. . . The sweep of the story is magnificent. 'It is a long story, filled with sunshine and shadow,' said Ingalls of her life as she told it, and that is true, too, of this admiring, enormous biography." — The London Times (U.K.).
    "Richly demythologizes the life and times of one of America's most treasured authors. . . Fraser assiduously avoids sentimentality. . . proving herself a fearless chronicler, adept at skewering sacred cows. She’s given us the definitive biography of a self-taught writer whose pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps mythology cloaked the shame of poverty and airbrushed a life perpetually teetering on the brink of doom." — The Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

  • POETRY:

    (FSG/Macmillan)
    WINNER OF THE 2018 PULITZER PRIZE FOR POETRY
    WINNER OF THE 2017 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR POETRY

    HALF-LIGHT: COLLECTED POEMS 1965-2016 by Frank Bidart
    The collected works of one of contemporary poetry's most original voices. The poems of Frank Bidart represent the human voice in all its extreme registers, whether it's that of the child-murderer Herbert White, the obsessive anorexic Ellen West, the tormented genius Vaslav Nijinsky, or the poet's own. Visionary and revelatory, intimate and unguarded, Bidart's Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2017 are a radical confrontation with human nature.
    "A single-minded exploration of the sources and meanings of emotional intensity, the passions, fears, and cravings that drive people to do what we do. . . Relentless and ever willing to face his demons, no matter how terrifying, in the interest of making great art, Bidart is one of the very few major living poets who never wavers, never repeats himself, and extends his questing and questioning through each new work. This collected poems is an almost overwhelming bounty, a permanent book." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Throughout his career, Bidart's self-devoting genius has been his ability to transform a poem into a vocalized performance of consciousness and moral interrogation, an occasion for metaphysical speculation as intense and oracular as any Shakespearean monologue or philosophical treatise. . . Sublime. . . Mesmerizing . . ." — The New York Times.
    "Frank Bidart has long challenged readers - and convention - with a complexity and originality not often seen in American poetry. Now readers can gain a deeper understanding of how Bidart's writing works together to create a vast, manifold narrative. The book closes with an ambitious section of new writing that deals with mortality and remembered friendships, a fitting way to end this monumental work." — The Washington Post.
    "Half-light is a tremendous literary event. One of the undisputed master poets of our time, Frank Bidart eats and breathes the high culture of the twentieth century. But Bidart is no mere aesthete; for him, art is a supreme life force, water in the desert of the soul, a talisman against oblivion. Bidart has honed and refined his relentlessly intense voice. . . Reading him, we feel less alone in our cosmic aloneness." — NPR


    The 2017 Man Booker Prize
    The Man Booker Prize is the world's most prestigious literary award. The prize promotes the finest in fiction by rewarding the very best novel of the year written in the English language.
  • The longlist (best 13 titles) was announced Wednesday, July 26, 2017.
  • The shortlist (best 6 titles) was announced Wednesday, September 13, 2017.
    • 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster (U.S.)
    • History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (U.S.)
    • Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan)
    • Elmet by Fiona Mozley (U.K.)
    • Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (U.S.) *** WINNER ***
    • Autumn by Ali Smith (U.K.)
  • The winner of the 2017 Man Booker Prize was announced Tuesday, October 17, 2017.
  • 2017 MAN BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEES (more...)
    All 13 longlist nominees are in stock at Walden Pond Books
    including U.K. editions published in advance of U.S. editions. The U.K. editions are always the first to sell out, so phone 510-832-4438 to reserve your copy ASAP.
    4321 by Paul Auster (U.S.) (U.S. edition in stock)
    Days Without End by Sebastian Barry (Ireland) (U.S. and U.K. editions in stock)
    History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (U.S.) (U.S. edition in stock)
    Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan) (U.S. edition in stock)
    Solar Bones by Mike McCormack (Ireland) (U.S. and U.K. editions in stock)
    Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor (U.K.) (U.K. edition in stock)
    Elmet by Fiona Mozley (U.K.) (U.K. edition in stock)
    The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy (India) (U.S. edition in stock)
    Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (U.S.) (U.S. edition in stock) *** WINNER ***
    Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie (Pakistan) (U.S. and U.K. editions in stock)
    Autumn by Ali Smith (U.K.) (U.S. and U.K. editions in stock)
    Swing Time by Zadie Smith (U.K.) (U.S. and U.K. editions in stock)
    The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (U.S.) (U.S. and U.K. editions in stock)

  • 2017 NOMINEES

    (Henry Holt/MPS)
    4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster
    Paul Auster has been turning readers' heads for three decades, bending the conventions of storytelling. He now presents his most capacious, demanding, eventful, suspenseful, erotic, structurally audacious, funny, and soulful novel to date. His first novel in seven years follows Archibald Ferguson through four different, simultaneous lives starting from his birth in Newark in 1947. This ravishing 880-page opus takes in momentous events, from the cold war through the Kennedy assassination and the My Lai massacre as its various personal stories unfold.
    "An epic bildungsroman! Original and complex. . . It's impossible not to be impressed - and even a little awed - by what Auster has accomplished. . . A work of outsize ambition and remarkable craft, a monumental assemblage of competing and complementary fictions, a novel that contains multitudes." — The New York Times.
    "A stunningly ambitious novel, and a pleasure to read. Auster's writing is joyful even in the book's darkest moments, and never ponderous or showy. . . An incredibly moving, true journey." — NPR.
    "Draws the reader in from the very first sentence and does not let go until the very end. An absorbing, detailed account - four accounts! - of growing up in the decades following World War II. Auster's prose is never less than arresting. In addition to being a bildungsroman, 4321 is a kunstlerroman, a portrait of the artist as a young man whose literary ambition is evident even in childhood. . . I emerged from this prodigious book eager for more." — The San Francisco Chronicle.


    (Viking/Penguin)
    DAYS WITHOUT END by Sebastian Barry
    After fleeing the Great Famine in Ireland, seventeen-year-old Thomas McNulty and his brother-in-arms, John Cole, join the U.S. Army and experience the harrowing realities of the Indian wars and the American Civil War. Moving from the plains of Wyoming to Tennessee, Sebastian Barry's latest work is a masterpiece of atmosphere and language and a haunting and unforgettable portrait of the most fateful years in American history.
    "Some novels sing from the first line, with every word carrying the score to a searing climax, and Days Without End is such a book. Pitch-perfect, the outstanding novel of the year." — The Observer (U.K.).
    "A haunting archeology of youth. . . Barry introduces a narrator who speaks with an intoxicating blend of wit and wide-eyed awe, his unsettlingly lovely prose unspooling with an immigrant's peculiar lilt and a proud boy's humor." — The New York Times.
    "For its exhilarating use of language alone, Days Without End stands out among the year's novels. Epic in conception, this brutal, beautiful book also features the year's most beguiling narrator. A great American novel which happens to have been written by an Irishman." — The Times Literary Supplement (U.K.).
    "Mr. Barry's frontier saga is a vertiginous pile-up of inhumanity and stolen love: gore-soaked and romantic, murderous and musical. The rough-hewn yet hypnotic voice that Mr. Barry has fashioned carries the novel from the staccato chaos of battle to wistful hymns to youth. . . an absorbing story that sets the horrors of history against the consolations of hearth and home." — The Wall Street Journal.
    "One of the most compelling, bravura and heart-wrenching fictional projects of recent memory. A work of staggering openness; its startlingly beautiful sentences are so capacious that they are hard to leave behind, its narrative so propulsive that you must move on. Breathtakingly exciting. . . A crowning achievement." — The Guardian (U.K.).


    (Atlantic/PGW)
    HISTORY OF WOLVES by Emily Fridlund
    Fourteen-year-old Linda, the awkward daughter of ex-commune members living in rural Minnesota, begins to take her first faltering steps towards independence. The arrival of an apparently ideal family seems to promise refuge for Linda, scorned as a ‘freak’ by her schoolmates. But things are not so simple. . . A propulsive and gorgeously written novel that introduces a new writer of enormous range and talent.
    "A stellar debut. A sense of foreboding subtly permeates the story. . . the wordsmithing is fantastic, rife with vivid turns of phrase. Fridlund has elegantly crafted a striking protagonist whose dark leanings cap off the tragedy at the heart of this book, which is moving and disturbing, and which will stay with the reader." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "An artful story of sexual awakening and identity formation. . . a novel of ideas, a page-turner of craft and calibration." — The New York Times.
    "Electrifying. . . History of Wolves isn't a typical thriller any more than it's a typical coming-of-age novel. Fridlund does a remarkable job transcending genres without sacrificing the suspense that builds steadily in the book. It is as beautiful and as icy as the Minnesota woods where it's set. With her first book, Fridlund has already proven herself to be a singular talent." — NPR.
    "An atmospheric, near-gothic coming-of-age novel turns on the dance between predator and prey. The novel has a tinge of fairy tale, wavering on the blur between good and evil, thought and action. But the sharp consequences for its characters make it singe and sing - a literary tour de force." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***


    (Riverhead/Penguin)
    EXIT WEST by Mohsin Hamid
    From the internationally bestselling author of The Reluctant Fundamentalist, an electrifying love story that unfolds in a country teetering on the brink of civil war. Fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed embark on a furtive love affair, thrust into premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. As violence and the threat of violence escalate, Nadia and Saeed decide that they no longer have a choice. Leaving their homeland and their old lives behind, they find a door and step through.
    "In spare, crystalline prose, Hamid conveys the experience of living in a city under siege with sharp, stabbing immediacy. He shows just how swiftly ordinary life - with all its banal rituals and routines - can morph into the defensive crouch of life in a war zone and how insidiously violence alters the calculus of daily life. By mixing the real and the surreal, and using old fairy-tale magic, Hamid has created a fictional universe that captures the global perils percolating beneath today's headlines." — The New York Times.
    “This is the best writing of Hamid's career. Readers will find themselves going back and savoring each paragraph several times before moving on. He's that good. Breathtaking!” — NPR.
    "Skillful and panoramic from the outset. A meticulously crafted, ambitious story of many layers, many geopolitical realities, many lives and circumstances. Here is the world, Hamid seems to be saying, the direction we're hurtling in. How are we going to mitigate the damage we've done?" — The New York Review of Books
    “A marvelously well-sustained dramatic monologue that reveals a great deal about its speaker, while also concealing precisely what he intends to do to his listener. Hamid employs a tone of radical simplicity that borders on brutality, and makes every conversation, every detail, every scene feel at once vital and under threat.” — The Guardian (U.K.)


    (Soho Press)
    SOLAR BONES by Mike McCormack
    Mike McCormack creates a terrifyingly real and startling world through the eyes of the late Marcus Conway, a civil engineer who reflects upon his life in one long transcendent, stream-of-conscious narrative. Memories bleed into one another, as the ghost of a man sits at his kitchen table and recalls event after event. A work of bold risks and luminous creativity, Solar Bones will draw comparisons to Ulysses - its fluid stream-of-conscious would do Joyce proud.
    "One-of-a-kind. McCormack is a wonderfully accessible, quick-witted writer - and, with references to Radiohead, Mad Max, and the post-millennial Battlestar Galactica, a smartly contemporary one. The book is alive with startling connections between the exterior and interior worlds. . . an irresistible driving rhythm. This transcendent novel should expand McCormack's following on this side of the Atlantic and further establish him as a heavyweight of contemporary fiction." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
    "A beautifully constructed novel that blends torrential monologues with a realist portrait of small-town Ireland. Lyrical. . . Tender. . . Caustic... This is an intelligent, striking work." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "The work of an author in the full maturity of his talent, Solar Bones climaxes in a passage of savage, Gnostic religiosity: the writing catches fire as we draw near to the void, pass over into death itself, and therein confront the truth that even in a fallen universe, when all distractions tumble away, the only adequate response to our being is astonishment." — The Irish Times (U.K.).
    "Mike McCormack's Solar Bones is exceptional indeed: an extraordinary novel by a writer not yet famous but surely destined to be acclaimed by anyone who believes that the novel is not dead and that novelists are not merely lit-fest fodder for the metropolitan middle classes." — The Guardian (U.K.).


    (Catapult/PGW)
    RESERVOIR 13 by Jon McGregor
    Midwinter in an English village. A teenage girl has gone missing. Everyone is called upon to join the search. The villagers fan out across the moors as the police set up roadblocks and a crowd of news reporters descends on what is usually a place of peace. And thirteen years go by. . . There are births and deaths; secrets kept and exposed; livelihoods made and lost. . . An extraordinary novel of cumulative power and grace explores the rhythms of the natural world and the repeated human gift for violence as the aftershocks of a tragedy refuse to subside.
    "A new novel from the absurdly gifted Jon McGregor is haunting and heartbreaking, the tale of a disappearance and its aftermath - his best yet. The rural village, the missing girl, the search for a body - then life goes on, as an archetypal story is rekindled with explosive results. McGregor is a writer with extraordinary control, and he uses the power of the archetype as well as our genre expectations for his own purposes. We’re pulled in from the first page. An enthralling and brilliant investigation of disturbing elements embedded deeply in our story tradition." — The Guardian (U.K.).
    "Award-winning Jon McGregor defies expectations with this superbly crafted and mesmerizingly atmospheric portrait of an unnamed village. Unsentimental and occasionally very funny, this is a haunting, beautiful book." — The Daily Mail (U.K.).
    "Even by the standards of his mature work, McGregor's latest novel is a remarkable achievement. Fluid and fastidious, its sparing loveliness feels deeply true to its subject. There are moments, as in life, of miraculous grace. . . a humane and tender masterpiece." — The Irish Times (U.K.).


    (JM Originals)
    ELMET by Fiona Mozley
    The clash of ancient concepts of property ownership with those of modern capitalist landlords builds to a violent climax in Fiona Mozley's debut novel. Atmospheric and unsettling, Elmet is a lyrical commentary on contemporary society and one family's precarious place in it, as well as an exploration of how deep the bond between father and child can go.
    (SPECIAL NOTE: Author Fiona Mozley wrote Elmet over a period of four years commuting to and from her job at The Little Apple Bookstore in York while studying to complete her degree in Medieval Studies.)

    "Fiona Mozley is a rising star. . . An utterly arresting novel about family, home, rural exploitation, violence and, most of all, the loyalty and love of children under siege. Elmet is in so many ways a wonder to behold. It is also this year’s David among the predictable Goliaths on the Booker list. How thrilling if David were to win against them." — The Evening Standard (U.K.).
    "A dark and delicate fairy-tale of contemporary Britain. Ms. Mozley writes with clarity and insight, and her descriptions of the natural world and human relationships are both specific and profound. Elmet is a quiet explosion of a book, exquisite and unforgettable. It is hard not to feel that at 29, Ms Mozley has only just begun." — The Economist (U.K.).
    "Thrums with energy and life. . . At the heart of the novel’s dramatic climax lies a dispute about property, about land divvied up and hacked to pieces, how borders are defined and how houses become homes. This is geopolitics played out on a small but no less powerful stage." — The Financial Times (U.K.).
    "A dark, bloody, astounding novel from Fiona Mozley. This moving tale set against a violent background has more than earned its place on the 2017 Man Booker longlist." — South China Morning Post.
    "Elmet is brave new writing, furrowing a rich vein of Yorkshire gothic, using the region’s language and landscape to chronicle a tale of an odd family under siege. Read it and rejoice in a new literary discovery." — The York Press (U.K.).


    (Knopf/Random)
    THE MINISTRY OF UTMOST HAPPINESS by Arundhati Roy
    Roy's first novel since her 1997 Booker Prize-winning debut, The God of Small Things is being acclaimed as her second masterpiece. Her new book is replete with eviscerating social critique and caustic humor, but it is also a deeply tragic and profound saga of the intersecting lives of unforgettable characters who take the reader on an intimate journey across the Indian subcontinent.
    "Fearless. . . staggeringly beautiful - a fierce, fabulously disobedient novel so fully realized it feels intimate, yet vibrates with the tragicomedy of myth. Roy is writing at the height of her powers. Once a decade, if we are lucky, a novel emerges from the cinder pit of living that asks the urgent question of our global era. Roy's novel is this decade's ecstatic and necessary answer." — The Boston Globe.
    "A fiercely unforgettable novel. . . a love story with characters so heartbreaking and compelling they sear themselves into the reader's brain." — USA Today.
    "Stirring. . . humane and impassioned. . . beautiful and rich. Roy's observations unspool as vivid and gimlet, whether she is describing personal catastrophe or national disasters. Brilliant writing - an ambitious story with a profound moral integrity and a deep emotional impact." — The Chicago Tribune.
    "This new book finds Roy writing in gorgeous, supple prose. Again and again beautiful images refresh our sense of the world. Sections of the book filled me with awe for the sheer fidelity and beauty of detail. Roy writes with astonishing vividness." — The New York Times.
    "A gem - a great tempest of a novel: a remarkable creation, a story both intimate and international. Here is writing that swirls so hypnotically it doesn't feel like words on paper so much as ink on water. This vast novel will leave you awed by the heat of its anger and the depth of its compassion."— The Washington Post.


    (Random)

    WINNER
    LINCOLN IN THE BARDO by George Saunders
    WINNER OF THE 2017 MAN-BOOKER PRIZE
    Short story virtuoso George Saunders delivers his first novel - a spellbinding story of love and loss that breaks free of its historical framework into a hilarious and terrifying supernatural realm. While mourning the passing of his son Willie in a Georgetown graveyard in his first year as President, Abraham Lincoln is accosted by the ghosts of dead Americans who are trapped in the Bardo - a transitional state between death and the next realm. As the spirits condemn, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance, the new President discovers that what is at stake is the fate of his son's soul.
    "A stunningly powerful work, both in its imagery and its intense focus on death, this remarkable work of historical fiction gives an intimate view of 19th-century fears and mores." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "A wild and wily improvisation that mirrors, by turns, the ambience of Hieronymus Bosch and Tim Burton. A boldly imagined, exquisitely sensitive, sharply funny, and utterly unnerving historical and metaphysical drama." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
    "The novel beats with a present-day urgency - a nation at war with itself, the unbearable grief of a father who has lost a child, and a howling congregation of ghosts, as divided in death as in life, unwilling to move on." — Vogue.
    "A true artist charting hidden creative territory. . . a luminous feat of generosity and humanism. In the graveyard’s slaves and slavers, drunkards and priests, soldiers of doomed regiments, suicides and virgins, are assembled a country. The wretched and the brave, and such is Saunders’s magnificent portraiture that readers will recognize in this wretchedness and bravery aspects of their own characters as well. He has gathered 'sweet fools' here, and we are counted among their number." — The New York Times.


    (Riverhead/Random)
    HOME FIRE by Kamila Shamshie
    Relocating Sophocles' Antigone to contemporary Britain and America, Kamila Shamshie weaves a timely tale of two Muslim families with differing ideas about bigotry, belief and loyalty. A suspenseful and heartbreaking story of immigrants driven to pit love against faith, with devastating consequences.
    "Shamsie's seventh and most accomplished novel. . . The emotionally compelling plot is well served by her lucid storytelling, and she digs into complex issues with confidence. In accessible, unwavering prose and without any heavy-handedness, Shamsie addresses an impressive mix of contemporary issues, from Muslim profiling to cultural assimilation and identity to the nuances of international relations. As this deftly constructed page-turner moves swiftly toward its inevitable conclusion, it forces questions about what sacrifice you would make for family, for love." — BookPage: Top Pick, August 2017.
    "Shamsie's latest is a haunting and arrestingly current portrait of two families forever caught in the insurmountable gap between love and country, loyalty and desire. An explosive novel with big questions about the nature of justice, defiance, and love." — Kirkus Reviews
    "Gut-wrenching and undeniably relevant to today's world. . . Shamsie peers deeply into her characters' innermost selves, delineating the complicated emotions, idealistic principles, and vulnerabilities that drive them. This shattering work leaves a lasting emotional impression." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
    "The novel has an enormous wingspan that catches a wonderful storyteller's wind. . . beautifully composed, and often terribly moving." — NPR.


    (Pantheon/Random)
    AUTUMN by Ali Smith
    Elisabeth and Daniel are each other's favorite people in the world, even though their paths cross only intermittently and he is 69 years older than she is. Their extraordinary friendship and conversations - about words, art, life, books, the imagination, how to observe, how to be - are at the center of this beautiful, subtle work, the seventh novel by Smith, who consistently produces some of Britain's most exciting, ambitious and moving writing.
    "Unbearably moving in its playful, strange, soulful assessment of what it means to be alive at a somber time. Ali Smith has a beautiful mind. And where her mind goes, you want to follow. . . Shrewd and dreamy, serious-but-not-solemn. . . I am struck by, and stuck on, Autumn. — The New York Times.
    "Like any successful novel of ideas, Autumn doesn't end; it reverberates in one's bones. Thus Smith's autumnal leaves cling to trees as the questions and quandaries linger. . . Autumn shimmers with wit, melancholy, grief, joy, wisdom, small acts of love, and wonder." — The Boston Globe.
    "This is undoubtedly Smith at her best. This book sets Smith's complex creative character in stone: puckish yet elegant, angry but comforting. Long may she remain that way." — The London Times (U.K.).
    "Impressionistic and intricate. . . the first serious post-Brexit novel. Smith is brilliant on what the referendum has done to Britain. At once sardonic and heartbreaking. . . Smith feels like a genial guide leading us through a torrent of ideas - about art, history, literature, feminism, memory. In a country apparently divided against itself, a writer such as Smith, who makes you feel known, who seems to speak to your own private weirdnesses, is more valuable than a whole parliament of politicians." — The Financial Times.


    (Penguin)
    SWING TIME by Zadie Smith
    At a dance class offered in a local church in London in the early 1980s, two girls recognize themselves in one another and become friends. But only one is a truly talented dancer. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, what constitutes a tribe, or makes a person truly free.
    "With homage to dance as a unifying force, arresting observations, exceptionally diverse and magnetizing characters, and lashing satire, Swing Time is an acidly funny, fluently global, and head-spinning novel about the quest for meaning, exaltation, and love." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
    "Zadie Smith’s fifth novel and for my money her finest. . . For its plot alone, Swing Time makes for truly marvellous reading. What makes the book so extraordinary are the layers on which it operates; beneath its virtuosic plotting lies the keenest social commentary. Swing Time has brilliant things to say about race, class, and gender, but its most poignant comment is perhaps this: given who we are, who we are told that we are not, and who we imagine we might become, how do we find our way home?" — The Guardian (U.K.).
    "A story at once intimate and global, as much about childhood friendship as international aid, as fascinated by the fate of an unemployed single mother as it is by the omnipotence of a world-class singer. Swing Time uses its extraordinary breadth and its syncopated structure to turn the issues of race and class in every direction. We finally have a big social novel nimble enough to keep all its diverse parts moving gracefully toward a vision of what really matters in this life when the music stops." — The Washington Post.
    "A multilayered tour-de-force. Smith burnishes her place in the literary firmament with Swing Time, her fifth novel. The work is so absorbing that a reader might flip it open randomly and be immediately caught up. Its precision is thrilling!" — The Los Angeles Times.


    (Doubleday/Random)
    THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD by Colson Whitehead
    WINNER OF THE 2017 PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION
    WINNER OF THE 2016 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR FICTION

    The unforgettable odyssey of a teenage slave named Cora, who flees the Georgia plantation where she was born, risking everything in pursuit of freedom. This is both a riveting adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.
    "Whitehead proves once again that he's a master of language - there are no wasted words in the book, and it's apparent that each sentence was crafted with exacting care. In Cora, he has also created a character that will likely be remembered for generations to come." — NPR.
    "A brutal, vital, devastating novel. The subtly antique prose and detailed description combine to create a world that is entirely convincing. I haven’t been as simultaneously moved and entertained by a book for many years. This is a luminous, furious, wildly inventive tale that not only shines a bright light on one of the darkest periods of history, but also opens up thrilling new vistas for the form of the novel itself." — The Guardian (U.K.).
    "A potent, almost hallucinatory novel that leaves the reader with a devastating understanding of the terrible human costs of slavery. One of the remarkable things about this novel is how Mr. Whitehead found an elastic voice that accommodates both brute realism and fablelike allegory, the plain-spoken and the poetic - a voice that enables him to convey the historical horrors of slavery with raw, shocking power. He has told a story essential to our understanding of the American past and the American present." — The New York Times.


    The 2017 National Book Award
    The National Book Award for Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People's Literature
    is presented by the National Book Foundation in partnership with The New Yorker.
    The longlist of 10 nominees in each category was announced on Friday, September 15, 2017
    The shortlist of 5 finalists in each category were announced on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 (* finalist)
    The awards were presented to the winners on Wednesday, November 15, 2017.

    [more...]

  • 2017 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR FICTION:
    * Dark at the Crossing by Elliot Ackerman
    The King Is Always Above the People: Stories by Daniel Alarcón
    Miss Burma by Charmaine Craig
    Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan
    * The Leavers by Lisa Ko
    * Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
    * Her Body and Other Parties: Stories by Carmen Maria Machado
    A Kind of Freedom by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton
    WINNER: * Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward
    Barren Island by Carol Zoref

  • 2017 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR NONFICTION:
    * Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge by Erica Armstrong Dunbar
    * The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America by Frances FitzGerald
    WINNER: * The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia by Masha Gessen
    * Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann
    No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein
    * Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America by Nancy MacLean
    The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein
    The Blood of Emmett Till by Timothy B. Tyson
    Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News by Kevin Young

  • 2017 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR POETRY:
    WINNER: * Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2016 by Frank Bidart
    When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities by Chen Chen
    * The Book of Endings by Leslie Harrison
    Magdalene: Poems by Marie Howe
    Where Now: New and Selected Poems by Laura Kasischke
    * WHEREAS by Layli Long Soldier
    * In the Language of My Captor by Shane McCrae
    Square Inch Hours by Sherod Santos
    * Don’t Call Us Dead: Poems by Danez Smith
    Afterland by Mai Der Vang

  • 2017 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE'S LITERATURE:
    * What Girls Are Made Of by Elana K. Arnold
    WINNER: * Far from the Tree by Robin Benway
    All the Wind in the World by Samantha Mabry
    You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins
    Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds
    * I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez
    Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder
    The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
    * Clayton Byrd Goes Underground by Rita Williams-Garcia
    * American Street by Ibi Zoboi



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